Google’s plan to discontinue support for Eclipse should not come as a surprise for the developers, considering the time and energy it has been devoting on its ambitious app development tool Android Studio. NDK support and other additions expected in near future will further boost performance of Google’s official Integrated Development Environment (IDE).

Offering a robust platform for the app developers to build relevant apps that can keep the users engaged is a prerequisite to increase the user base. In an arena where less than thirteen percent (12.4) users are using the latest Android apps such step was imminent.

Investing in the latest offing

Google team has worked to posit Android Studio as an excellent IDE empowered with Android SDK tools, latest platform of Android Lollipop and Google APIs. Developers might assume it as an effort to support development of popular apps around latest Android Application Development tools. But they ought to perceive it as an effort to offer a uniform experience to the end users using apps built around Android Studio.

Tested to perform


Tested to perform



Another reason to focus on Android Studio is that this IDE has successfully undergone trials and has earned developers praise after completing its cycle of acid tests. With some of the fixes, now the platform will offer amazing experience to the Mobile app developers. Contrary to critics’ opinion, this move is sure to earn positive response from the inquisitive and observant app developers.

Good with Eclipse, better with Android Studio

After its launch last year, Android Studio is now a mature app development platform which does not require special plugins and configurations. Developers who are habituated to old Android Developer Tools (ADT) like Eclipse may access it from an open source, still switching to Android Studio is going to help them in a big way ultimately.

Right time to migrate



The process of migration from Eclipse to Android Studio may be time consuming in the beginning, owing to repetitive tasks and additional learning that is required. Still, migrating to Android Studio will help Android app developers to receive future IDE updates and relevant supports to the developers.

Performance booster on the anvil

Discontinuing support for Eclipse ADT and Android Ant build system is a strategic move to focus energy on promoting Android Studio. Expect more tools to optimize the robust performance of Google’s first official IDE for the Android application development in coming months.